Online dating and mental illness | Tips and advice | Time To Change

21 People Get Real About Dating With Anxiety & Depression

dating someone with mental problems

At least when we are open it is easier for the right kinds of people talk to us and help us and equally easier to talk openly in return. Related to Mental Health. Some mental illnesses and disorders are just too complex and debilitating for one person to handle alone. If you enjoyed reading this post, then sign up to my email list here and I'll send you a supportive quote each day to help you through your depression: I feel extremly lucky because as a direct result of this I have met a very kind and open partner who has understood from the start that I have a mental illness and he has never held it against me.

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Two people with illogical thoughts can come to many unhealthy and illogical conclusions. Trust your partner first and foremost, both about themselves and about their mental health. On top of that, when we're in the grips of a panic attack, manic episode, or serious depression, it's hard for our partners to know what's really going on or what they can do to make it easier for us. I actually decided not to mention it specifically. We have so many insights and pep talks and encouraging words we want to say. It is so hard to find someone who is willing to put up with all the ups and downs of any mental illness unfortunately, no matter how much love is there

She was a great girl, but she refused to get treatment for her depression. We had some good times, but more often than not, our relationship was strenuous and exhausting. Some nights she'd call me at four in the morning needing me to talk her out of suicide. Other nights she'd call me slurring into the phone because she'd gotten drunk alone in her apartment. She'd often get irritable and start fights over nothing. Other times she'd feel so insecure that I'd have to spend hours trying to convince her that, yes, I did find her attractive, that yes, I did think she was funny, that yes, I did think she was interesting, that yes, I did think she was.

For months I tried to convince her to reach out for help, but she always made up an excuse. Over time I grew more and more drained, and eventually, I couldn't take it anymore.

I realised that she was always going to be this way, and that if I stayed with her, she'd just continue to drag me down with her. So sadly, I left. And in such a case, I wasn't discriminating against her, nor was I being prejudiced. I tried my best to save her, and once I realised I couldn't, I chose to save myself. I don't think it's fair to blame anyone for doing that. If the person you've just started dating discloses to you that they have a mental illness, don't stigmatise them and immediately end the relationship.

Instead, read up on their illness so that you know more about it, and ask them how they're handling it. Ask them how far along the road to recovery they are. Ask them what they're doing to try and get better. From there, you'll be able to better decide how you want to proceed with the relationship. Now, if you're the one with the mental illness, then I'd advise you to honestly ask yourself which of the above categories you fall in to. If it's the first, and someone doesn't want to date you once you tell them you have a mental illness, then shame on them.

If it's the second and they reject you, then I think it's more of a compatibility thing: On the other hand, if you fall into the third category and someone rejects you, then you're kidding yourself if you blame stigma.

The person in question is not rejecting you because they're being a prejudicial asshole - they're rejecting you because you're not fit to be in a healthy relationship, and because you're not seeking treatment, there's nothing to suggest that you ever will be.

So please, if you're in this position, then do yourself a favour and reach out for help. You deserve to be happy and in a loving relationship, so take that first step and give yourself a chance to let it happen. If you enjoyed reading this post, then sign up to my email list here and I'll send you a supportive quote each day to help you through your depression: Get top stories and blog posts emailed to me each day.

I need to step back and let him take care of himself. Two people with illogical thoughts can come to many unhealthy and illogical conclusions. Consider joining a group like Celebrate Recovery or find a compassionate listening program like Humble Warrior to get an outside perspective on your inside problems. Whereas I was a chatty pisces needing to bear my soul every five minutes, my husband was not a talker. He tended to shut down instead of facing issues head on. But mental illness makes it even more important.

Both partners need to feel fulfilled and valued. If one person is constantly melting down, forcing the other to be strong and stable, it will probably never work. And check in often to make sure you are succeeding in those efforts.

Find a friend who is not your partner to keep you accountable for sticking to them. Building a successful relationship with someone with mental illness is not impossible. But when both people struggle with mental illness, it can take a lot of work and commitment. Both partners need to give what they can to help their partners stay healthy.

But both also need to be able to receive what they need to stay stable. Follow this journey here. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here. Find this story helpful? Share it with someone you care about. Please click here if you are not redirected within a few seconds. You can also browse from over health conditions. Log In Join Us. Be on the lookout for co-dependence This is a tough one. Join a group for outside perspective Two people with illogical thoughts can come to many unhealthy and illogical conclusions.

Getty image via Archv. Continue reading this story She is passionate about issues relating to depression, anxiety, parenting, and longevity. She currently serves as a communications and longevity expert for Senior Living Fund.

Related to Mental Health. Share or Copy Link. I also have approval-seeking tendencies that leave me feeling upset, used, restless and irritated. As a Black male, I was told to keep these details [ You can do anything you set your mind to. I either win or learn.

Iamges: dating someone with mental problems

dating someone with mental problems

Nobody was going to hold me accountable in the end but myself.

dating someone with mental problems

Illustration is the crux of picture books. So please, if you're in this position, then do yourself a favour and reach out for help.

dating someone with mental problems

I think this is such great advice. And I know I need a partner who understands that dark side of me. Disability Dating Site Dating online in addition to having a mental illness or physical dating someone with mental problems can make finding the right person tough but not impossible. That really depends on the nature of the condition as well as its severity. All we need is someone to listen in a nonjudgemental way matchmaking kl remind us that everything will, actually, be okay.